Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems

The Computer Information Systems (CIS) program emphasizes the ways in which information technologies can best be used in a business or organization. Students can work in a project-oriented environment in courses such as Systems Analysis, Software Engineering, Human-Computer Interaction, and Database Theory and Design. CIS students learn about the relationship between information systems and the organizations they serve, including the design and support of computer-based systems. CIS helps students learn not only how the technology works in the big picture, but also how to think through what type of technology should be used to solve a specific business problem. This major is an important link to today’s growing technology systems, a crucial element in any business or organization. The major requires students to take foundation courses that use Java and C++. Other supporting courses for the CIS major are in business, economics, statistics, and calculus. Senior year students design a Capstone course where they research, design, and implement their own unique project.

THE COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS MAJOR IN PHOTOS

Requirements for the Major

The Computer Information Systems (CIS) program emphasizes the ways in which information technologies can best be used in a business or organization. CIS students learn about the relationship between information systems and the organizations they serve, including the design and support of computer-based systems. CIS work in a project-oriented environment, which helps them understand not only how the technology works in the big picture, but also how to think through what type of technology should be used to solve a specific business problem. This major is an important link to today’s growing technology systems, a crucial element in any business or organization. Senior year students design a Capstone course where they research, design, and implement their own unique project.

Computer Information Systems and Supporting Courses:

CS 151 Principles of Computer Science I CS 152 Principles of Computer Science II CS 221 Systems Analysis CS 251 Data Structures CS 310 Human-Computer Interaction CS 321 Database Theory and Design CS 351 Software Engineering CS 601 Computer Science Capstone I CS 602 Computer Science Capstone II ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II OR MTH 135 Concepts of Statistics ECO 150 Principles of Microeconomics MTH 150 Calculus I OR MTH 131 Applied Calculus MTH 241 Discrete Mathematics

And two of the following Computer Information Systems and Supporting courses:

CS 252 The Internet OR CS 271 Neural Networks: The Computing Perspective CS 311 Computer Architecture CS 331 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms CS 341 Artificial Intelligence CS 351 Software Engineering CS 411 Language Design and Implementation CS 421 Operating Systems CS 431 Data Communications/Networks CS 441 Computer Graphics CS 590-594 Field Experience/Internship (1-4 SH)

Internship/Field Experience:

A student may wish to arrange an off-campus experience with a business, industry, service agency, high school, governmental office, or another appropriate organization. The course credit for an internship depends on the length and the actual learning situation. Students work with their academic advisor to determine the credit. Many of the supervising organizations pay a salary although this is not necessary. We believe that this is a valuable learning experience for an individual during the junior or senior year.

In recent years students have had internships at the National Energy Technology (Dept. of Energy); Lucas Systems Inc.; Applied Physics Laboratory (the division of Johns Hopkins University); Bright Futures Academic Corp.; Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC); and Caputo Insurance Agency. Students have also participated in Research Experience for Undergraduates programs (REU) at the University of Michigan, Texas A&M University, and Kansas State University. In addition, Dr. Shaffer works with student lab assistants for the UNIX Lab and for the CS 151 Lab.

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH A COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEGREE?

Imagine yourself a systems analyst, business analyst, programmer, database administrator, web designer, or software designer.

Program taught in:
  • English

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Sep 2019
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