B.S. Mechatronics Engineering

Kent State University, College of Aeronautics and Engineering

Program Description

B.S. Mechatronics Engineering

Kent State University, College of Aeronautics and Engineering

Description

The Bachelor of Science degree in Mechatronics Engineering integrates mechanical, electrical, computer and controls engineering to understand automated machinery, specifically, how to design it and how to make it work. Mechatronics engineering revolves around the design, construction and operation of automated systems, robots and intelligent products, which result from the integration of software and hardware.

Using automated systems is becoming more popular for operating equipment or machinery on manufacturing lines, boilers and aircraft to reduce labor costs, increase precision and accuracy and provide quality and safety for workers. Mechatronic devices can be found in agriculture, hospitals, buildings, homes, automobiles, manufacturing plants, the toy and entertainment industry and in aids for the elderly and disabled.

FULLY OFFERED AT:

Kent Campus

97599_DSC_1239-Mechatronics.jpeg

Admission Requirements

The university affirmatively strives to provide educational opportunities and access to students with varied backgrounds, those with special talents and adult students who graduated from high school three or more years ago.

Admission to the Mechatronics Engineering major is selective.

Freshman Students: Admission into the Mechatronics Engineering major requires a minimum 3.0 high school GPA and a minimum 24 ACT composite score (minimum 24 ACT sub-scores in both English and mathematics) or a minimum 1160 SAT composite score (mathematics, critical reasoning and writing); and placement directly into MATH 12002 (or its equivalent).

Students who do not meet these requirements may apply for admission to the Mechatronics Engineering Technology major and request to change their program to the Mechatronics Engineering major after their freshman year if they meet the following criteria: minimum 3.200 overall Kent State GPA and minimum B grade in both MATH 12002 and PHY 23101.

English Language Proficiency Requirements for International Students: All international students must provide proof of English language proficiency (unless they meet specific exceptions) by earning a minimum 525 TOEFL score (71 on the Internet-based version), minimum 75 MELAB score, minimum 6.0 IELTS score or minimum 48 PTE Academic score, or by completing the ELS level 112 Intensive Program.

Transfer Students: Admission into the Mechatronics Engineering major requires a minimum 12 credit hours in college-level coursework with a minimum 3.200 overall GPA and a minimum B grade in both MATH 12002 and PHY 23101 (or their equivalents). Transfer students who have completed less than 12 credit hours of college-level coursework will be evaluated on both collegiate and high school records and must submit a final high school transcript and an ACT or SAT score.

Program Learning Outcomes

Graduates of this program will be able to:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.
  2. An ability to design a system, component or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturing and sustainability.
  3. An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

What Is the Difference Between Engineering and Engineering Technology?

The line between the two is becoming more blurred since responsibilities overlap more now than ever. In general, an engineer has a theoretical understanding of how something is happening. The curriculum for engineers includes high-level math, theory, and conceptual design. Whereas, the curriculum for engineering technology programs focus on the implementation of engineering principles to solve problems. Engineering Technology tends to be more hands-on and application-oriented teaching students to operate, maintain, troubleshoot, inspect, and test systems. Graduates from these programs can speak intelligently about the technology to communicate with those on the plant floor, upper management and customers and users for sales purposes. It is possible that both engineers and engineer technologists may design a product to solve a problem, but the engineer would be more likely to discover new technology, practice, or principle. An engineering technologist would use the new technology created by the engineer and apply it to the product they are designing. The engineer develops the big picture and the engineering technologist works out the details.

97602_FuelCellResearchTeamgroupinlab-MasterTechnologyinSustainableSystems.jpg

Program Requirements

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS [BS-MENG]

Major Requirements (courses count in major GPA)

  • Course List Code, Title, Credit Hours
  • AERN 15300 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING ANALYSIS USING MATLAB® 3
  • TECH 13580 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS I 3
  • TECH 20002 MATERIALS AND PROCESSES 3
  • TECH 20004 FUNDAMENTALS OF CIRCUIT ANALYSIS 3
  • TECH 23581 COMPUTER-AIDED ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 3
  • TECH 26010 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 3
  • TECH 26200 PROGRAMMING FOR ENGINEERS I 3
  • TECH 33031 PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS 3
  • TECH 33033 HYDRAULICS/PNEUMATICS 3
  • TECH 33040 MOTORS AND CONTROLLERS 3
  • TECH 33092 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (ELR) (WIC) 1 1-3
  • TECH 33111 STATICS AND STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 3
  • TECH 33220 ELECTRONIC DEVICES 4
  • TECH 33222 DIGITAL DESIGN FOR COMPUTER ENGINEERING 3
  • TECH 33363 METALLURGY AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 3
  • TECH 36200 PROGRAMMING FOR ENGINEERS II 3
  • TECH 37666 KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY 3
  • TECH 43030 MECHATRONICS 3
  • TECH 43031 MECHATRONICS II 3
  • TECH 43220 ELECTRICAL MACHINERY 3
  • TECH 43580 COMPUTER-AIDED MACHINE DESIGN 3
  • TECH 47200 SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 3

Additional Requirements (courses do not count in major GPA)

  • COMM 15000 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN COMMUNICATION (KADL) 3
  • MATH 12002 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS I (KMCR) 5
  • MATH 12003 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS II 5
  • MATH 32051 MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES I 4
  • MATH 32052 MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES II 4
  • PHY 23101 GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I (KBS) (KLAB) 5
  • PHY 23102 GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II (KBS) (KLAB) 5
  • UC 10097 DESTINATION KENT STATE: FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE 1
  • Kent Core Composition 6
  • Kent Core Humanities and Fine Arts (minimum one course from each) 9
  • Kent Core Social Sciences (must be from two disciplines) 6
  • Kent Core Additional 3

Minimum Total Credit Hours: 121

1 A minimum C grade must be earned to fulfill the writing-intensive requirement.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  • Minimum Major GPA: 2.250
  • Minimum Overall GPA: 2.000

Mechatronics Engineering added to Kent State Fall 2018 BS Programs

Kent State University’s College of Aeronautics and Engineering (CAE) is offering a brand new engineering program: Mechatronics Engineering. What is mechatronics you ask? The word mechatronics is a combination of mechanical engineering and electronics, but has since evolved to include computer and control systems. Robotics and automated systems are good examples of mechatronic systems.

The college also recently moved three of its concentrations under the Bachelor of Science in Applied Engineering to their own majors, which means the college now offers a Bachelor of Science in:

  • Computer Engineering Technology
  • Mechanical Engineering Technology
  • Mechatronics Engineering Technology

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Engineering still exists with two concentrations: Applied Engineering and Technology Management and new Fall 2018 - Foundry Technology.

The College is also offering non-credit FANUC Industrial Robotics training. Upon successful completion of the course, participants will receive the FANUC Robotics CERT I industry credential.

So now the questions are, what is the difference between engineering and engineering technology? The line between the two is becoming more blurred since responsibilities overlap more now than ever. In general, an engineer has a theoretical understanding of how and why something is happening. The curriculum for engineers includes high-level math, theory and conceptual design. Whereas, the curriculum for engineering technology programs focus on the implementation of engineering principles to solve problems. Engineering technology tends to be more hands-on and application-oriented teaching students to operate, maintain, troubleshoot, inspect and test systems.

According to a 2015 Deloitte report based on U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics and Gallup Survey, by 2025, 3.4 million manufacturing jobs will be needed nationally to manage growth. Approximately, 2.7 million baby boomers are expected to retire and an estimated 700,000 new manufacturing jobs due to economic expansion will be created, but only 1.4 million jobs are likely to be filled. This suggests 2 million will remain unfilled, due to a lack of workers garnering appropriate skills and knowledge.

When thinking about industrial robots used in automated systems, we traditionally think about the automotive industry. However, a recent article by ATI Industrial Automation stated that almost 11,000 robots valued at $507 million were shipped to North American customers during the first three months of 2018 with substantial growth in non-automotive areas. Life sciences experienced a 262 percent increase while plastics/rubber (130 percent), and food/consumer goods (64 percent). This suggests that a skilled workforce is necessary across many different industries to design efficient, cost-effective systems and keep them operational.

In addition to academic clout, CAE student organizations enhance learning by allowing students to apply their knowledge in real-life scenarios. The Robotics Club annually builds a competition robot that in theory would be capable of traversing the surface of Mars and digging into its crust to gather soil for testing. They test their design every May at the Kennedy Space Center. The Xtreme Bots team builds robot(s) that face other teams’ robots in battle. The team participates in competitions in Dayton, Ohio in fall and spring. Students in the College are encouraged to volunteer at the First Tech Challenge robotics qualifying tournament for middle and high school students. The College has hosted this event every February for the past three years.

This school offers programs in:
  • English


Last updated November 17, 2018
Duration & Price
This course is Campus based
Start Date
Start date
Sept. 2019
Duration
Duration
Full time
Price
Price
10,012 USD
Ohio Resident; Non-Ohio Resident: $18,714.00
Information
Deadline
Contact school
Locations
USA - Kent, Ohio
Start date : Sept. 2019
Application deadline Contact school
End date Contact school
Dates
Sept. 2019
USA - Kent, Ohio
Application deadline Contact school
End date Contact school